An obituary for ‘Lost’

‘Lost’

Sept. 22, 2004 — May 23, 2010

“Lost,” age six seasons, passed away with dignity on the evening of May 23, 2010. Memorial services were held a half hour later on “Jimmy Kimmel Live” with Jimmy Kimmel officiating. Special music was performed by Michael Giacchino. There will be no burial as its body of work has been donated to the Internet for extensive study.

Born Sept. 22, 2004, “Lost” was the brainchild of Damon Lindelof, J. J. Abrams, Jeffrey Lieber and Carlton Cuse, et al., all of whom survive, unlike most of their characters.

“Lost” has captivated, confused, irritated and infuriated millions of viewers the world over. We, its family of fans, have laughed with Hurley; loved with Jin and Sun; contemplated life, the universe and everything with Jack and Locke; hated on Kate; and drooled over shirtless Sawyer. We’ve flashed back, flashed forward and even flashed sideways, but unfortunately, never flashed by Sayid. (Drat.) We’ve been thrown for loops, made speechless, gasped in shock and blown away (but not literally, like Arzt and Ilana).

“Lost” leaves a legacy of life lessons: live together, die alone; it’s never too late for a second chance; no man (or woman) is an island; DUI charges will get you killed off; never mess with unstable dynamite.

In addition to its creators, “Lost” is survived by Elizabeth Mitchell of “V,” Ian Somerhalder of “The Vampire Diaries,” Daniel Dae Kim of “Hawaii 5-O,” sibling series “Fringe,” also created by Abrams, and the numbers 4, 8, 15, 16, 23, 42.

It was preceded in death by the Dharma Initiative, most of the passengers of Oceanic Flight 815, a host of Others, Jacob, the Man in Black, “Felicity” and “Alias.”

In lieu of flowers, the producers ask that memorial donations be made in the form of DVD preorders.

ABC Studios was in charge of the arrangements.

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3 Comments

Filed under death, television

3 responses to “An obituary for ‘Lost’

  1. I think what I’ll always remember about “Lost” was the way it would start up a conversation about a really interesting topic and then suddenly change subjects and never go back and finish what it was saying earlier. It was quirky, that “Lost” but I loved it.

  2. Pingback: An Obituary For ‘ Lost ‘ Small Town Girl at astronomersdoitinclusters

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